Edhec-Risk
Social Sciences
Green Growth: From Theory to Action, From Practice to Power

Authors: Editors: Stéphanie Bory, Muriel Cassel-Piccot
Editions: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Pages: 270 pages
Date: November 2013
 
 
 
Summary
This book examines the theme of globalisation, the environment and the challenges of technology, and elucidates problems raised by these issues, providing a forum for critical reflection in the two domains of theory and practice, on the one hand, and action and power, on the other.

With the continuing globalisation of technology, the debate on certain environmental issues has become pervasive, shaping thought and action in all sectors of the economy and levels of society. From films such as Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth (2006) or Yann Arthus-Bertrand’s Home (2009), to shifts in the political landscape, as seen in the increasing number of seats won by Green Parties in European, regional and local elections or the Copenhagen, Cancùn and Durban Climate Change Conferences summits (2009, 2010, 2011) and the Earth Summits in Stockholm and Rio (1972, 1992, 2012), or even more controversial events like the East-Anglia University scandal and Claude Allègre’s writings, questions of environmental policy have moved to the forefront of every public forum.

Green Growth: from Theory to Action, from Practice to Power, following an international conference in Lyon bringing together academics, socio-economic actors and politicians in order to facilitate exchange and reflection on both ecology as a field of study and environmentalism as a movement, offers a pluralistic approach, addressing cultural, social, legal, economic and political issues on a common platform.

Michael Edesess, Research Associate at EDHEC-Risk Institute, contributed a chapter to the book entitled "Is Economic Growth Sustainable?", in which he studies the fundamental divide existing between mainstream economists and most environmentalists as to whether economic growth can continue forever. His article demonstrates that it is possible for three reasons: first, technological advances could enable growth to continue indefinitely, next the standard measure of the size of the economy—GDP—is defined in such a way that it enables economic growth to continue forever, and last economic growth can be construed as analogous to sustainable evolutionary processes of natural ecosystems.

About the Editors:

Stéphanie Bory is a Senior Lecturer in British Studies at Université Lyon 3 - Jean Moulin, France, where she has been teaching since 2001. She is also a member of the Institute for Transtextual and Transcultural Studies, and works on environmentalism as well as nationalism, particularly with regards to Wales. She obtained a PhD on the environmental policy of the National Assembly for Wales in 2008. She has published numerous articles, including one in Environmental Issues in Political Discourse in Britain and Ireland, and has participated in several conferences on these topics.

Muriel Cassel-Piccot is a Senior Lecturer in British Studies at Université Lyon 3 - Jean Moulin. She first started her career as a researcher in mass communication, British media, and advertising. Since then, she has expanded her field of research to British politics (especially the Liberal Democrats), paying particular attention to the parties' communication strategies. She has recently focused on communication relating to key social issues such as the protection of the environment and the management of an ageing population.
 
 

URL for this document:
http://www.edhec-risk.com/edhec_publications/books/RISKBook.2015-02-10.2640

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